Conference Chair
Jane Moore



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August 16 - Sunday Morning

 

Sunday, 8:00 am to 9:30 am

* Featured Session *
Plenary Presentation:
Recognition, Reward and Tenure: You've Got to be Kidding!
Track: Other
Presenters: Carl Berger
Bayshore Ballroom
It's tough enough getting reward and tenure using the traditional track of research, publishing and teaching and service. But what if you're deeply involved with developing, testing and evaluating new technology, pedagogy and content that really changes learning? Now that the digital student is turning into the digital instructor and joining colleagues that were millennial faculty all along how can they be recognized, rewarded and tenured for this kind of work? If we can't change the current practices for review and tenure can we modify them to include the kind of work we do? These topics will be explored along with some solutions and examples that are starting to emerge in the complex and fast changing environment in which we’re all working.

Sunday, 10:00 am to 10:30 am
Regular Session (30 minutes):
C'est la (Seconde) Vie! Using Second Life to Teach French Literature
Track: Track 1: Innovations in Online Teaching and Learning
Presenters: Thomas Armbrecht
San Carlos
The presenter will present the scavenger-hunt and role-playing activities that have been created within Second Life to improve students' oral and written communication in French. The audience will be allowed audience members to interact with the bot, heads up display, and learning environments designed to teach the fundamentals of French literature, but which can be applied to other disciplines. In addition to discussing the challenges and advantages of teaching in Second Life, The presenter will demonstrate how pedagogical goals can be realized through interaction with authentic, albeit virtual, French speakers, by forming international friendships, and by teaching key concepts about French grammar, culture, and literature.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
In Search of Effective Online Andragogy: A Case Study at San Jose State University
Track: Track 1: Innovations in Online Teaching and Learning
Presenters: Noni Reis, Arlando Smith, Gary Stebbins, Mei-Yan Lu, Stephen Kay, Po-Sen Huang
San Martin
Budget constrains, flexibility for students, pressure from for-profit on-line degree-awarding institutions of higher education are among the reasons that university administrators often pressure faculty to teach on-line classes. However, the reasons that many faculty members fail to enthusiastically embrace the opportunities afforded by on-line classes are many. In this presentation, we examine the barriers that discourage faculty from taking advantage of on-line teaching, demystify on-line learning, illustrate the connections between adult learning theory and on-line learning, discuss several web 2.0 social networking collaboration tools, and share survey/interview results of seasoned on-line faculty.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Integrating Video Learning Objects Into Your Online Class
Track: Track 1: Innovations in Online Teaching and Learning
Presenters: Garry Roleder
San Juan
This session will demonstrate a content rich, multicourse, video repository that may be used to enhance online instruction. Experienced instructors will show how they have successfully integrated video clips into online classes using the Intelecom Online Resource Network - a multidisciplinary, digital video repository. Faculty will learn how to use the repository's contents including search functions, clip saving, hyperlink creation, and how to creatively construct student learning activities. Each attendee will receive a detailed information package describing the repository and be given access to the repository.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Actualization of Mathematical and Abstract Subjects Using Computer-Based Guided Tutorials
Track: Track 2: Faculty Development
Presenters: Porscha McRobbie
Santa Clara

Do you teach a course that involves highly abstract topics and find it difficult to find computer-based assignments to augment such topics? This presentation will describe interactive computer-based assignments designed to be complimentary to lecture material that does not follow the standard format of existing textbooks. Each module is self-contained and requires no prior experience with the software (Mathematica). A major advantage of these modules is the ability of any instructor to tailor/update them with a minimal amount of programming knowledge. The modules were developed for an advanced undergraduate chemistry course, but the framework is transferable to other subjects.

Click here to view a recording of this session.


Regular Session (30 minutes):
Using Self-Study to Explore the Possibilities of Hybrid Course Design
Track: Track 2: Faculty Development
Presenters: Harriet Fayne
Carmel
This session focuses on a self-study project conducted by faculty at Otterbein College (a comprehensive college with a small graduate education program). Using Moodle as the course management system, the instructors collaborated with more than 30 teachers and examined both possibilities and challenges created by running parallel classes each week(one virtual, one physical) in a course focused on research methods. Session attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a simulation that will give them a first-hand experience with self-study, a promising professional development model for faculty who wish to integrate new technologies into their teaching repertoires.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Make them YOURS: How to Package LOs
Track: Track 3: Featured Community of Practice: Mathematics and Statistics
Presenters: Dave Childers, Brenda Gunderson, Joel Vaughan
San Simeon
Do you wish your students would come to class better prepared? Through PreLabs, students at the University of Michigan are exposed to core statistical ideas before attending class. Web-based applets, which allow students to gain deeper understanding through simulation and visualization, are incorporated into some PreLab assignments. While many of the available statistics applets on MERLOT have problems such as confusing notation or poor content, such difficulties are overcome by packaging the LO in a Jing Video. Through Jing, students receive guidance from an instructor while using an imperfect applet.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Giving (and Getting) Credit Where Credit is Due
Track: Track 4: Creative Collaborations
Presenters: Jonathan Maybaum
Monterey
Current approaches to distributing Reusable Learning Objects (RLOs) are deficient in documentation and analysis of usage and attribution: - Quantifying page views and downloads don't provide authors with credible documentation that their materials are actually being used and are having impact, to support promotion and tenure decisions, to conduct research on the use of RLOs, and to support requests for funding of such research. - Once an RLO is released for distribution, the author generally cannot discover who has used or modified it, and is therefore unable to benefit from such work. - There is currently no systematic means of identifying RLOs that are related to ones already known to be of interest. This presentation summarizes a plan to address these shortcomings.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
From ChitChat to Discourse: Improving Online Discussion
Track: Track 5: Evaluation and Assessment of Success
Presenters: Dorothy Fuller
San Jose
Quality of student postings in online course discussions continues to be a major concern. This session presents one method of using a participant rating function found in many learning management systems to rate postings based on their helpfulness in supporting student learning. Participants then use the rating averages to reflect on the quality of their postings as judged by their peers, to identify ways of improving the quality of their future postings, and to create personal goals for improving their discussion contributions.

Sunday, 10:45 am to 11:15 am
Regular Session (30 minutes):
Creating Online Classes Using the WorldImages Database
Track: Track 1: Innovations in Online Teaching and Learning
Presenters: Kathleen Cohen
San Juan
Well-selected illustrations enliven on-line courses and themselves serve as primary sources. The session will demonstrate the use of the WorldImages database to create on-line courses, emphasizing ways that faculty can search and use the database. One class, Web of Art and Culture,a world cultures course, is found on the publicly accessible WorldImages site. Each of 16 modules contains illustrated text, a study guide, self-tests, and discussion questions with images. Another on-line course, Islamic Art & Culture,is being developed using WebCT and will have controlled access. Student on-line presentations will also be demonstrated. The database contains more than 70,000 copyright-cleared images on a variety of topics.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Mythbusting: College Students as Wikipedia Editors, a Surprising New Pathway to Information Literacy
Track: Track 1: Innovations in Online Teaching and Learning
Presenters: Davida Scharf
San Carlos
Is there a role for Wikipedia in undergraduate library instruction? At the NJ Institute of Technology a librarian and a writing professor collaborated on an assignment that turned college students into Wikipedia authors with surprising results. This constructivist learning experience integrated research, writing and presentation skills in face-to-face and online environments, suggesting a new approach to the incorporation of Web 2.0 technology into information literacy instruction. This mythbusting project turns student and faculty views of Wikipedia inside out. The assignment, instruction, pitfalls, assessment and student work will be shared. Faculty, librarians, and instructional designers will learn why our students rush to tackle this assignment and how learning happens along the way.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Pedagogical Preparation from a Student and Course Designer Perspective
Track: Track 2: Faculty Development
Presenters: Susan Eliason, Christine Holmes
Carmel
During this interactive session, participants will explore a faculty certification professional development model for WebCT/Blackboard. Faculty come to teaching with personal experience and subject expertise. The model demonstrates a pedagogical preparation for faculty to experience a student and course designer perspective that may improve instruction and assessment of student learning. Presenters will describe the rationale, planning process, implementation, assessment, and future goals for this ongoing professional development experience. Materials will include PowerPoint slides, handouts, models of communication (such an adjunct faculty guidebook), and web links to the Anna Maria College Center for Teaching Excellence.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Technologies of Engagement: Incorporating Service-Learning into the Online Classroom
Track: Track 2: Faculty Development
Presenters: Betsy Eudey
Santa Clara
In the last decade, two of the most marked curricular advancements involve the growth of online education and service learning. This presentation addresses the intersections of these advancements, examining methods and technologies that support engagement in online service learning projects. The session draws upon the presenter’s personal teaching experiences and published reports of best practices to provide practical advice for instructors and the resources needed to help faculty development coordinators support faculty who wish to create online service projects. The session will include a combination of a brief presentation, resource sharing, interactive handouts, and question and answer.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Concepts In Math and Science for 5th to 8th Grade Teachers
Track: Track 3: Featured Community of Practice: Mathematics and Statistics
Presenters: Shelton Fitzpatrick
San Simeon
This session will showcase activities which are aligned with Arkansas Curriculum Frameworks and National Standards. Participants will be trained with regard to the best practices and recognized teaching techniques and strategies for improved teaching effectiveness with low income, minority, and academically challenged 5th to 8th grade students. No Child Left Behind is the unifying theme as teachers are taught how to better understand content areas tied to Arkansas standards and to incorporate NSTA and NCTM standards of science and mathematics pedagogy and technology use in their classroom.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Integration of Videoconference and Distance Open Learning for Mathematics Teaching
Track: Track 4: Creative Collaborations
Presenters: Jean Valery Mefire Mfondoum
Monterey
I am a student at the Teacher’s advanced school. Our project involves the three Cameroonian high schools of Garoua, Njimom, and “Cite verte.” The collaborative part of the project consists of distance sharing of teaching materials in mathematics and of the pedagogical tools using VCDs. and DVDs. Teachers and the students experience this sharing through live video conferences on mathematics, file sharing using servers, and live online chats between the students. Advantages of this collaboration are as follows: initiation of students to self-training using digital materials such as VCDs and DVDs, extension of the teaching area to the homes of the students, the possibilities associated with providing remote lessons through video conferences, and interchange of pedagogical tools.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Simplifying Grading and Improving Student Performance and Perceptions with Rubrics
Track: Track 5: Evaluation and Assessment of Success
Presenters: Vicki Harsh
San Jose
Rubrics facilitate evenhanded assessment and model both the project planning and the review/assessment processes that the student will encounter in the workplace. Assessing via rubrics promotes a learning atmosphere in which assessment is fair and transparent to the students, and reflects a movement toward authentic (product based) assessment. After this session participants will be able to: • identify basic types of rubrics • incorporate rubrics into the assessment strategy • find or create rubrics online using rubrics-generation sites and repositories.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Develop and Share New Incentives for Community Colleges
Presenters: Phil Moss
San Martin
Proposed federal legislation would provide significant funds to community colleges for the development and sharing of online course content. In this session, participants will discuss the prospects and opportunities this exciting new program may offer, and how participation in collaborative efforts like MERLOT may be helpful.

Sunday, 11:30 am to 12:00 pm
Regular Session (30 minutes):
Engaging and Challenging Introductory Chemistry Students Using Real-Life Experiments
Track: Track 1: Innovations in Online Teaching and Learning
Presenters: Iyun Lazik
San Simeon
This presentation will showcase a series of experiments using real-life chemistry developed for introductory chemistry students to initiate them in more sophisticated data analysis (Excel), technology, and instrumentation (FTIR and Visible spectroscopy). Instructors in introductory chemistry courses will witness our approach to implement various experiments, as well as, using the online-course management system, Blackboard, in updating laboratory manuals and increasing instructor-student communication. Experiment, student surveys and results will be shared. Pedagogically speaking, introduction of real-life based experiments and use of web-enhanced course management system improved the traditional introductory chemistry course, giving it a more student-oriented success focus.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Got Game? Serious Games for Education
Track: Track 1: Innovations in Online Teaching and Learning
Presenters: Jeff Borden
Carmel
Join Jeff Borden for his version of Serious (Educational) Gaming as it meets the world of alternative reality games (ARGs). We’re going to play a game of educational clue, complete with learning outcomes, content objectives, curriculum integration, and various multi-modal learning opportunities. On trial for plagiarism are two classmates: Stewart Dent and Shirley M. Guiltay. By the time we are through, you will be shown several examples and various ways to create gaming content for your subject matter. Do you want to play a game? Start now! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jd1NGA0H1xo

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Stepping into Your Future: Strategies for Success Using Interactive Technologies to Meet Statewide Needs
Track: Track 1: Innovations in Online Teaching and Learning
Presenters: Douglas Cremer, Larry Green
San Carlos
This K20 California Education Technology (CETC) collaborative provides an on line, strength based program, grounded in research and available to students ‘any time, any place’. The business software provides a seamless entry for students and access to the learning material, participation in live synchronized learning sessions and data collections. The technology provides a flexible, cost effective distribution model. Moodle hosts the highly interactive lessons, supplemental learning material, Camtasia video ‘mini lectures’ and CCC Confer’s Elluminate web based conferencing tool allows Math and ELA instructors to ‘meet’ with students across the state. Orientation, enrollment training and professional development are provided virtually.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Teaching Game Programming Online Using JavaScript
Track: Track 1: Innovations in Online Teaching and Learning
Presenters: Pennsylvania Wu, Phillip Chang
San Juan
In a virtual classroom, students need a language that allows them to easily reproduce and test the game codes, and a platform in which they can generate the expected results to learn visually. Instructors need a language that is functionally sufficient to create less complicated, easy-to-understand game codes and use them to teach key concepts of game programming online. With JavaScript, students can learn game programming by completing hands-on activities and immediately publish their JavaScript games to the Web. The authors will present how they create JavaScript games and use them to teach introductory college game programming courses online.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
You Can Do It! Practical Uses of Web 2.0 Tools in Your Online Classroom
Track: Track 1: Innovations in Online Teaching and Learning
Presenters: Gail Krovitz
San Martin
Many discussions about Web 2.0 tools focus on the technical “how to” aspects of these tools, and forget to address why you would use them in a class, and how you would integrate them with the rest of the course structure. Before utilizing these tools you should ask: does this tool have true educational value, or is it just adding bells and whistles to the class? This presentation shows examples of some Web 2.0 tools in a sample online course, such as Wikis, Blogs, Flickr, Del.icio.us, Google Docs, Voice Thread, Jing, and YouTube.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Let Them Drive!
Track: Track 2: Faculty Development
Presenters: Stephen Nodine
Santa Clara
Faculty can best relate to a new idea or tool if they have a physical, sensory experience. Training and consultation must fully and actively engage faculty in this process. While hands-on classes have long been a staple of faculty training, at Clemson, we let faculty drive the systems as well as topics of discussion, including: • Hands-on classes • Office visits • Open labs • Setting class agenda Engendering an environment of active, hands-on faculty engagement is not difficult, but it does require a deliberate, integrated effort. Sometimes it means us sitting in the passenger’s seat and letting them drive!

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Collaborative Knowledge Construction in Online Database: Why to Promote and How to Investigate
Track: Track 4: Creative Collaborations
Presenters: Rikki Rimor
Monterey
Fifty eight students collaborated to construct an on-line database, based on sorted messages from the course forum. Students’ contribution to the database was analyzed through personal and collective criteria of knowledge construction. Collective learning orientation was measured by the student's previous contribution to the forum. The results showed differential achievements among learners with different learning orientation. While the ‘collaborative learners’ contributed more collective knowledge, the ‘individual learners’ focused on constructing their own personal knowledge. These findings have important implications on planning, coordinating and evaluating collaborative learning environment.

Regular Session (30 minutes):
Creating Culturally-Relevant OERs Across Cultures
Track: Track 4: Creative Collaborations
Presenters: Lesley Farmer
San Jose
This session discusses how faculty across the globe can collaboratively design and incorporate culturally-relevant Open Educational Resources (OER) for teacher preparation programs. In order to maximize high-quality teacher training regionally, CSU Long Beach and Lucknow University (India) education faculty partnered to develop a Train-the-Trainer model that incorporated OERs. Education faculty visited each other’s campuses to develop the plan and learn about OERs. Lucknow faculty cadre are trained at CSULB, designing instructional modules (incorporating MERLOT learning objects) to adapt and use in India. Teacher trainers will contribute additional culturally-relevant OERs for further training, to be housed locally and linked to MERLOT.

Remote Presentations
View These Remote Presentations Online

Practical Steps for Creating Community in Asynchronous Online Instruction
By Nima Salehi, Instructional Designer, Metropolitan State University

Demonstration and Assessment of a Modular Courseware Format Using a VB.NET Programming Course as an Example
By Dr. Larry Press, Professor of Information Systems, California State University, Dominguez Hills

IT Literacy 3.0 – Six Types of Writing for the Internet and Notes and Exercises for Teaching Them
By Dr. Larry Press, Professor of Information Systems, California State University, Dominguez Hills

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